Venser, the Sojourner
 
Community Rating:
0.51.01.52.02.53.03.54.04.55.0
Community Rating: 3.946 / 5  (185 votes)
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Card Name:
Venser, the Sojourner
Mana Cost:
3WhiteBlue
Converted Mana Cost:
5

Types:
Planeswalker — Venser
Card Text:
+2: Exile target permanent you own. Return it to the battlefield under your control at the beginning of the next end step.
−1: Creatures can't be blocked this turn.
−8: You get an emblem with "Whenever you cast a spell, exile target permanent."
Loyalty:
3
Rarity:
Mythic Rare
All Sets:
Duel Decks: Venser vs. Koth (Mythic Rare)Scars of Mirrodin (Mythic Rare)
Card Number:
1
Artist:
Rulings
1/1/2011 Emblems behave similarly to enchantments: They have an ability that, in a general sense, continually affects the game. The primary difference between them is that emblems aren't permanents and don't exist on the battlefield. Nothing in the game can remove an emblem, simply because no other spell or ability references them. Once you get an emblem, you keep it for the rest of the game. Emblems have no color, name, card type, or other characteristics beyond the listed ability
1/1/2011 The first ability can target any permanent you own, including those another player controls.
1/1/2011 If the first ability exiles a token, that token will cease to exist. It won't return to the battlefield.
1/1/2011 A permanent exiled by the first ability will return to the battlefield under your control at the beginning of the next end step even if you no longer control Venser at that time.
1/1/2011 Venser's second ability doesn't lock in what it applies to. That's because the effect states a true thing about creatures, but doesn't actually change the characteristics of those creatures. As a result, all creatures can't be blocked that turn, including creatures you don't control, creatures that weren't on the battlefield at the time the ability resolved, and creatures that have lost all abilities.
1/1/2011 Venser's last ability creates an emblem with a triggered ability. The emblem is the source of the triggered ability. Because emblems are colorless, you can target permanents with protection from white or from blue, for example, with the triggered ability.
1/1/2011 Whenever you cast a spell, the emblem's ability triggers and goes on the stack on top of it. It will resolve before the spell does.
1/1/2011 If you control more than one such emblem, each one's ability will trigger separately whenever you cast a spell.
7/1/2013 Planeswalkers are permanents. You can cast one at the time you could cast a sorcery. When your planeswalker spell resolves, it enters the battlefield under your control.
7/1/2013 Planeswalkers are not creatures. Spells and abilities that affect creatures won’t affect them.
7/1/2013 Planeswalkers have loyalty. A planeswalker enters the battlefield with a number of loyalty counters on it equal to the number printed in its lower right corner. Activating one of its abilities may cause it to gain or lose loyalty counters. Damage dealt to a planeswalker causes that many loyalty counters to be removed from it. If it has no loyalty counters on it, it’s put into its owner’s graveyard as a state-based action.
7/1/2013 Planeswalkers each have a number of activated abilities called “loyalty abilities.” You can activate a loyalty ability of a planeswalker you control only at the time you could cast a sorcery and only if you haven’t activated one of that planeswalker’s loyalty abilities yet that turn.
7/1/2013 The cost to activate a planeswalker’s loyalty ability is represented by a symbol with a number inside. Up-arrows contain positive numbers, such as “+1”; this means “Put one loyalty counter on this planeswalker.” Down-arrows contain negative numbers, such as “-7”; this means “Remove seven loyalty counters from this planeswalker.” A symbol with a “0” means “Put zero loyalty counters on this planeswalker.”
7/1/2013 You can’t activate a planeswalker’s ability with a negative loyalty cost unless the planeswalker has at least that many loyalty counters on it.
7/1/2013 Planeswalkers can’t attack (unless an effect turns the planeswalker into a creature). However, they can be attacked. Each of your attacking creatures can attack your opponent or a planeswalker that player controls. You say which as you declare attackers.
7/1/2013 If your planeswalkers are being attacked, you can block the attackers as normal.
7/1/2013 If a creature that’s attacking a planeswalker isn’t blocked, it’ll deal its combat damage to that planeswalker. Damage dealt to a planeswalker causes that many loyalty counters to be removed from it.
7/1/2013 If a source you control would deal noncombat damage to an opponent, you may have that source deal that damage to a planeswalker that opponent controls instead. For example, although you can’t target a planeswalker with Shock, you can target your opponent with Shock, and then as Shock resolves, choose to have Shock deal its 2 damage to one of your opponent’s planeswalkers. (You can’t split up that damage between different players and/or planeswalkers.) If you have Shock deal its damage to a planeswalker, two loyalty counters are removed from it.
7/1/2013 If a player controls two or more planeswalkers that share a planeswalker type, that player chooses one of them and the rest are put into their owners’ graveyards as a state-based action.