Koth of the Hammer
 
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Community Rating: 4.055 / 5  (384 votes)
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Card Name:
Koth of the Hammer
Mana Cost:
2RedRed
Converted Mana Cost:
4

Types:
Planeswalker — Koth
Card Text:
+1: Untap target Mountain. It becomes a 4/4 red Elemental creature until end of turn. It's still a land.
−2: Add Red to your mana pool for each Mountain you control.
−5: You get an emblem with "Mountains you control have ‘Tap: This land deals 1 damage to target creature or player.'"
Loyalty:
3
Expansion:
Rarity:
Mythic Rare
All Sets:
Duel Decks: Venser vs. Koth (Mythic Rare)Scars of Mirrodin (Mythic Rare)
Card Number:
94
Artist:
Rulings
1/1/2011 Emblems behave similarly to enchantments: They have an ability that, in a general sense, continually affects the game. The primary difference between them is that emblems aren't permanents and don't exist on the battlefield. Nothing in the game can remove an emblem, simply because no other spell or ability references them. Once you get an emblem, you keep it for the rest of the game. Emblems have no color, name, card type, or other characteristics beyond the listed ability
1/1/2011 Koth's first ability can target any Mountain, including an untapped Mountain and/or a Mountain another player controls.
1/1/2011 If Koth's first ability animates a Mountain that came under your control that turn, it will have "summoning sickness" and be unable to attack. It will also be unable to be tapped to activate an ability with the {T} symbol in its cost, such as the Mountain's mana ability or the ability granted to it by Koth's emblem.
1/1/2011 Loyalty abilities can't be mana abilities. Koth's second ability uses the stack and can be countered or otherwise responded to. Like all loyalty abilities, it can be activated only once per turn, during your main phase, when the stack is empty, and only if no other loyalty abilities of this permanent have been activated this turn.
1/1/2011 Koth's emblem grants an activated ability to each Mountain you control at any given time for the rest of the game. It will continuously check which permanents you control are Mountains to determine what has the ability. For example, a Mountain that comes under your control later in the game will have the ability, while a Mountain you controlled at the time the emblem was created, but that later came under the control of another player, will no longer have the ability.
7/1/2013 Planeswalkers are permanents. You can cast one at the time you could cast a sorcery. When your planeswalker spell resolves, it enters the battlefield under your control.
7/1/2013 Planeswalkers are not creatures. Spells and abilities that affect creatures won’t affect them.
7/1/2013 Planeswalkers have loyalty. A planeswalker enters the battlefield with a number of loyalty counters on it equal to the number printed in its lower right corner. Activating one of its abilities may cause it to gain or lose loyalty counters. Damage dealt to a planeswalker causes that many loyalty counters to be removed from it. If it has no loyalty counters on it, it’s put into its owner’s graveyard as a state-based action.
7/1/2013 Planeswalkers each have a number of activated abilities called “loyalty abilities.” You can activate a loyalty ability of a planeswalker you control only at the time you could cast a sorcery and only if you haven’t activated one of that planeswalker’s loyalty abilities yet that turn.
7/1/2013 The cost to activate a planeswalker’s loyalty ability is represented by a symbol with a number inside. Up-arrows contain positive numbers, such as “+1”; this means “Put one loyalty counter on this planeswalker.” Down-arrows contain negative numbers, such as “-7”; this means “Remove seven loyalty counters from this planeswalker.” A symbol with a “0” means “Put zero loyalty counters on this planeswalker.”
7/1/2013 You can’t activate a planeswalker’s ability with a negative loyalty cost unless the planeswalker has at least that many loyalty counters on it.
7/1/2013 Planeswalkers can’t attack (unless an effect turns the planeswalker into a creature). However, they can be attacked. Each of your attacking creatures can attack your opponent or a planeswalker that player controls. You say which as you declare attackers.
7/1/2013 If your planeswalkers are being attacked, you can block the attackers as normal.
7/1/2013 If a creature that’s attacking a planeswalker isn’t blocked, it’ll deal its combat damage to that planeswalker. Damage dealt to a planeswalker causes that many loyalty counters to be removed from it.
7/1/2013 If a source you control would deal noncombat damage to an opponent, you may have that source deal that damage to a planeswalker that opponent controls instead. For example, although you can’t target a planeswalker with Shock, you can target your opponent with Shock, and then as Shock resolves, choose to have Shock deal its 2 damage to one of your opponent’s planeswalkers. (You can’t split up that damage between different players and/or planeswalkers.) If you have Shock deal its damage to a planeswalker, two loyalty counters are removed from it.
7/1/2013 If a player controls two or more planeswalkers that share a planeswalker type, that player chooses one of them and the rest are put into their owners’ graveyards as a state-based action.